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Adding more doesn’t (always) mean better

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    When we’re faced with a problem, do we add another thing, or do we dive deep to find the route cause?

    I was reminded this weekend of this question as I helped my mother-in-law. She’s recently moved to a new home and after a few months of struggling to get live TV through her Smart TV, asked me to take a look. The solutions she’s been given from someone else? Buy an additional piece of £200+ equipment which should (they hope) allow her to watch live TV.

    But does the additional spend solve the problem or just add a sticking plaster?

    The reason that the TV doesn’t allow her to watch live TV is that the house she’s moved into doesn’t have an aerial, it has a satellite dish. The TV, doesn’t think she has permission to access live TV, because it can’t find a supplier card. So what are her options?

    • Buy a FreeSat Box for around £200 (this is from a quick search, so cheaper options are likely available)
    • Replace the current TV with a FreeSat ready version (also close to, if not more than £200)
    • Ask her landlords to help her install a TV aerial (I got one quick quote for around £140)

    To me, the answer seems obvious, ask the landlords for the aerial. But, why am I writing a blog post here about this? Well, I am often asked to help train organisations on a tool, or do some work to help connect a piece of software to another. But, this isn’t often the simplest route, or something that solves the problem.

    What’s the lesson here then?

    Before you make an investment in what seems to be the quick fix, take a step back and ask if there are any other options. Not sold yet? This great post on LinkedIn, might take you all the way.

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    • Adding more doesn’t (always) mean better

      Adding more doesn’t (always) mean better

      I was reminded this weekend of this question as I helped my mother-in-law. She’s recently moved to a new home and after a few months of struggling to get live TV through her Smart TV, asked me to take a look. The solutions she’s been given from someone else? Buy an additional piece of £200+ equipment which should (they hope) allow her to watch live TV.